Monday, September 30, 2019

Drug Smugglers found floating on 1.2 tonnes of Cocaine

Three drug traffickers were discovered using packages of cocaine to stay afloat after their boat sank off the coast of Colombia. Rescuers were members of the Colombian Navy who spotted the men 30 nautical miles off the coast of Tumaco in the Narino Department of western Colombia. Authorities have confirmed the packages contained 1.2 tonnes of cocaine.

The Colombian Navy has seized a total of 163 tonnes of cocaine so far this year.

Quebecers with HA ties nailed with 45kg cocaine

Two Quebecers, Vincent Muller and Anne-Marie Dubé of Saint-Jérôme were arrested in August in Kansas with 45kg of cocaine in their car. Vincent Muller is in a business relationship with the Hells Angels. He is also the former front man of peeler bar Le Garage, in Mirabel. The establishment has belonged to Eric Grenier, the businessman dubbed "the Quebec Hugh Hefner."
The duo had left LA, before being arrested in Kansas. They were on their way back to Toronto. According to his social networks, Vincent Muller travels around the globe, to Italy, France, Malta, Jordan, Monaco and Laos.

He has a history of unauthorized possession of prohibited or restricted weapons, and possession for the purpose of trafficking.

Sunday, September 29, 2019

Elderly cocaine mules claim innocence - Convicted

Three judges convicted retired chef Roger Clarke, 72, and his ex-secretary wife Sue, 71, of drugs trafficking after a one-day trial at Lisbon’s main criminal court. They were jailed for eight years each. They will serve their sentences in Portugal instead of being kicked out of the country and sent back to Britain to do their jail time as a state prosecutor had requested.

Now Mrs Clarke has moaned about her conditions in jail, claiming she's being kept in an unheated cell with four other women. Clarke admitted in court she had been with her husband when they took the four cases containing the drugs onto their cruise ship.
An elderly British couple busted on a luxury cruise ship with $1.25m in cocaine are blaming a mysterious Jamaican businessman. Roger Clarke, 72, a former chef, and wife Sue, 71, a retired secretary, were arrested Dec. 4 in Lisbon when cops found 9 kg of the drug inside their luggage.
They were on a $8,500 Caribbean cruise, paid for by the mystery man.
The man instructed them to buy exotic fruit for sale in the UK, and then pick up “empty” new suitcases in St. Lucia from an unidentified middleman.

Their improbable tale becomes moreso after it came to light that they were convicted and imprisoned in 2010 for trafficking nearly 530 pounds of cannabis resin in Norway. The fixed income couple recently bought a villa in Spain. They also attempted to recruit their friends into being drug mules. They face up to 12 years behind bars if convicted of drug trafficking.

Bad week for Rudy Giuliani, Trump

Former New York mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani took to the airwaves to defend President Trump – and it didn't always go well.

Saturday, September 28, 2019

California halts prison gang peacemaking effort

California prison officials have halted an effort aimed at forcing warring prison gangs to get along after the inmates wound up brawling and even rioting when placed together. At the heart of the problem is the Fresno Bulldogs prison gang that has participated in 32 battles with other prison gangs over the last year.Violence erupted 27 of the 45 times gang members were in the same yards.
The Fresno Bulldogs is a street gang with more than 6,000 loosely affiliated members. They took the name and mascot of California State University, Fresno, and wear the college's trademark red clothing. Members are loosely affiliated on the streets but their membership solidifies in prison. In the prison system the Bulldogs do not get along with anybody.

Friday, September 27, 2019

Gene-test fraud billed $2.1b to U.S. Medicare

Those charged included nine doctors.In what prosecutors are calling one of the biggest health-care frauds in history, Medicare was fraudulently billed $2.1b after seniors were enticed to take unnecessary genetic tests for cancer. The Justice Department said that 35 defendants associated with telemedicine companies and cancer genetic testing labs had been charged with fraud.
Fraudsters preyed on people's fears of harboring genetic markers for cancer. Bills to Medicare connected with the scam typically ranged from $7,000 to $12,000. Since 2007, a Medicare fraud task force has filed more than 1,600 cases against almost 3,500 defendants who are alleged to have fraudulently billed Medicare more than $13 billion.

Thursday, September 26, 2019

White House Mob Boss Trump: 'Do Us a Favor'

What favor was President Trump demanding from Ukraine’s President Zelensky? It was to get political dirt on Joe Biden or his son.
Trouble is the U.S. government had already investigated the allegation under the Obama administration and found nothing to it.
POTUS was threatening the Ukraine president by withholding $391m in foreign aid to Ukraine. The whistle blower complaint accuses the president, Attorney General William Barr, and the president’s personal attorney Rudy Giuliani of serious wrongdoing. Impeachment proceedings likely will reveal whether or not POTUS has exercised criminal behavior in asking a foreign government head, and perhaps others, to “do us a favor.”
See ----->Rudy Giuliani - 'Filthy Few'
See ----->Mob Boss Trump demands protection from flippers

Wednesday, September 25, 2019

Groom steals bait bike on way to reception

Over the course of four days, Kamloops police targeted bicycle thefts through the use of a bait bike program — with eight men arrested and 23 charges laid.

One of those arrested was a man who had just been married hours earlier. The 41-year-old was en route to his formal wedding reception. The well dressed thief saw a locked, high end bike and found time to stop, cut the lock off and steal it. The bike was recovered from the man’s vehicle ... and he was also nailed for driving when prohibited.
Cops said none of the eight arrested were homeless. Most of those involved are in the drug scene.

HA Noseworthy wants his colors back


All had to stop near Highway 20 for a police check. The police check was not going quickly enough for Noseworthy's liking who threatened to shove a camera up a policewoman's ass. The loud threat was heard by many.
Earl Noseworthy wants to stop the confiscation of his "offending property" which is accused by cops of being "a tool of intimidation to facilitate crimes."

On August 10, 2018, East Toronto chapter sergeant-at-arms Noseworthy and other HA came to Montérégie for Canada Run.
Even bikers present were said to be left open mouthed at the dopey comment.

Noseworthy was found guilty of obstructing police in June and was slapped with a one-year probation and community service. His efforts to retrieve his club jewelry and colors continue to this day.

Tuesday, September 24, 2019

Rock Machine expanding into Australia

Recent arrests in South Australia confirm the Rock Machine, a Canadian import, has expanded into Australia.

Among those arrested are the gang’s local president and secretary. 41-year-old Boss Alexander Illich has been charged with drug and firearms offences. Cops found a loaded Glock and around 1.5kg of meth. First reports of the gang in Australia came from Perth in 2009. In 2013 it was reported the Rock Machine was aligned with the Bandidos in Victoria and had around five chapters in Australia.

Mobster's $250k cheque hard to collect

Mafia veteran Thomas “Tommy Shots” Gioeli suffered a fractured kneecap chasing down an errant ping pong ball in prison. The one-time street boss of the Colombo crime family won a $250k settlement, but now federal prosecutors want to scoop the cash to help cover $360,000 in court-ordered restitution. Gioeli, acting as his own attorney, filed a biblical 83-page court document from his prison cell arguing the injury payoff from the federal Bureau of Prisons was his alone.
The career tough guy, described by witnesses as a cold-blooded killer during his 2012 trial where he was convicted of racketeering, wants the restitution order amended. Gioeli, citing case law, argued it was “both noteworthy and relevant” that a 2012 ruling found the federal courts lacked the “inherent power” to impose payback as part of a sentence. The gangster is less than halfway through his 18 1/2-year prison term and pays $25 every three months, with a current balance owed of $359,800

Monday, September 23, 2019

LA Presse - Montreal Mafia: Flourishing in 'free trade'

"The Hells Angels have control in Quebec but also in Montreal. What we realize is that all the other strains of organized crime are accountable to the Hells Angels," says Chief Inspector Guy Lapointe of the Sûreté du Québec.

La Presse has drawn up an organization chart of the main actors of the mafia and the Hells Angels that make up Montreal organized crime. It consists of a core of about twenty individuals, groups and clans revolving around a half a dozen "decision-makers" of the Hells Angels. There is a distinct Hells Angels hierarchy. Not all members have the same influence and those on the margins are not decision makers. Mafiosi and bikers exchange services between them on a regular basis, in a system that brings them all a lot of money.
He no longer officially wears Hells Angels colors, but Mario Brouillette is considered the most influential actor of organized crime in Montreal according to the SQ.

Martin Robert, 44, whose princely wedding made headlines has an international Hells Angel status. He has strong ties to aboriginal organized crime. Stephane Plouffe, Salvatore Cazzetta and Salvatore Brunetti round out the top 5. Giuseppe Focarazzo, 44, is said to be involved in the financing and recycling of money. He is considered the new strongman of Laval.
Vito Salvaggio, Leonardo Rizzuto, Nicola Spagnolo, Liborio Cuntrera and Stefano Sollecito are still associated with the mafia leadership says LA Presse. The Sicilian clan continue to run one of the most important illegal sports books in the Montreal area.

Gregory Woolley is spending the last years of an eight-year sentence. He was seen by police as one of the leaders of the Hells Angels-mafia-gang alliance. Despite his detention, Woolley is still considered an influential player. Nicknamed the "street boss" by cops, Davide Barberio would be the one who solves the problems on the street.

Drug linked Jaguar in forfeiture crosshairs

Cops watched Kyle Robert Bird make at least four drug deals while driving around Langley in his 2013 Jaguar XF. The B.C. director of civil forfeiture wants the car forfeited as an “instrument of illegal activity.” Inside his house, cops found 10 kg of MDMA or ecstasy, 839 fake OxyContin pills, 879 fake Xanax tablets, magic mushrooms, hash, buffing agent, drug packaging materials, scales, a cocaine press, cellphones and a score sheet. Cops also found HA support gear. Bird hasn't been criminally charged, yet.

The setback hasn't slowed Bird down. Property records indicate he recently got himself a brand new 2019 Jaguar F-Pace.

Saturday, September 21, 2019

Vagos Biker lies about brothers

Prosecutors have asked a judge in Las Vegas to throw out the testimony of a star witness in a federal racketeering trial. They say he lied on the witness stand. The trial stems from a 2011 shootout that killed a rival Hells Angels leader in a northern Nevada casino. Prosecutors say Gary “Jabbers” Rudnick lied after spending more than three days telling jurors that Vagos Motorcycle Club members had plotted to kill Jeffrey Pettigrew, 54, in Sparks.

Prosecutors had argued the killing was an orchestrated murder among criminal conspirators that had received a “green light” go-ahead from the Vagos international president. Defense attorneys have asked to have the murder and racketeering charges thrown out.
Jeffrey "Jethro" Pettigrew
The slaying of Pettigrew followed a series of clashes between members of the two motorcycle clubs in San Jose, California.

The eight men standing trial represent the first of three groups totaling 21 defendants. Video surveillance showed Pettigrew pistol-whipping another man on the casino floor before gunfire broke out. During the fight, Pettigrew was shot and killed.

Friday, September 20, 2019

Our Godfather

Tommaso Buscetta was a man who was simultaneously the most important, most endangered, and most wanted man in criminal history. Buscetta did something no man had ever dared to before: he betrayed the Cosa Nostra, the notorious Sicilian Mafia, where he once held a position of power and respect.

He provided testimony at the Maxi Trial, which remains the largest anti-mafia trial in history and which saw 475 mafioso jailed, many for life. Buscetta fled Italy to get away from the Second Mafia War that had been instigated by Toto Riina in 1980s.
Buscetta died in 2000. His past followed him to Brazil, where he was asked to helm a drug-trafficking operation. Buscetta politely refused, and whatever Riina was told infuriated him. Riina never had any ideals, and in a bid to send a message to Buscetta, targeted his family.

Buscetta's sons were the first to go. They were tortured, killed, and dissolved in acid. Riina targeted and killed his brother, his nephew, his son-in-law, his brother-in-law, and four grandchildren. The only way out for him and his family was to broker a deal. He provided evidence and testified, and in exchange, he was sent to the US under a new identity in the Witness Protection Program.
Buscetta's story is the subject of documentary 'Our Godfather,' which premiered on Netflix on September 18.

Thursday, September 19, 2019

NYPD cop busted for Cocaine, protecting dealers

Ishmael BaileyIshmael Bailey, 36, a 12-year veteran with the NYPD thought nobody would notice when he provided security for El Chapo's narco wife Emma Coronel Aispuro as she attended her husband’s drug trafficking trial. Investigators began looking closer into Bailey’s affairs and found the security detail was just one of a long list of shady side gigs.
Bailey was nailed on charges of conspiracy and sale of a controlled substance for acting as security twice when loads of cocaine were transported from various locations around Queens. Bailey was arrested by officers with the NYPD’s Internal Affairs Bureau after a sting. He was also charged with possession of a controlled substance, bribe receiving and official misconduct. Bailey wept at his brief arraignment as a judge ordered him held on $50,000 bond and $25,000 cash bail.

If convicted, he faces up to 15 years behind bars.

Winnipeg cops raid Manitoba HA clubhouses for being booze cans

Road 65 N. in the rural municipality of RosserWinnipeg cops raided two Manitoba HA clubhouses and charged three with selling liquor without a licence. Cops learned from rats that there was a set price for booze at the clubhouse bars and the HA thought that the law couldn't touch them if they put up signs that read "Donations".

Individuals 'donated' between $3 to $5 to the HA for their booze. The club also ran tabs with a book behind the bar recording sales.
The 3 charged are Dale Donovan, who uses the name Kelland and is the president of the Manitoba Nomads, full patch Lorne Corlett, and prospect Cameron Barron.

Donovan made global headlines for the club in 2018 when he called on his brothers to slag a 'discriminating' bar that refused to cater to those in HA colors. Police said raids were carried out in Kelowna, Sudbury, St. Catharines, Ottawa and Toronto.
See ----->Manitoba Hells Angels do fraud on small businesses

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Poacher's root of choice - wild ginseng

The global illegal wildlife trade, which includes flora and fauna, is estimated at $12-30 billion annually.The stakeout in the remote area of Ontario was coming to a conclusion. As the 2 poachers emerged from the bush they were immediately arrested. What were they stealing? Wild ginseng, which is protected in Canada, and cannot be touched. The two men pleaded guilty to picking ginseng. They received fines of $5,000 and $4,000 as well as four-month suspended sentences.
Natural American ginseng is rare and rapidly going extinct. Poaching poses the greatest threat. Natural ginseng can sell for anywhere from several hundred to thousands of dollars per root depending on its shape and size. A single root the size of an adult finger can fetch $1,000.

The plant is slow to mature and reproduce and requires specific growing conditions. It takes a decade for a sizable root to form. Cultivated ginseng requires herbicides and is seen as inferior in quality and taste.

Worse, there is something called 'replant disease', meaning cultivated ginseng cannot ever be planted on the same ground twice.
Wild American ginseng grows in southern Ontario and western Quebec, and down to Georgia and Louisiana. French settlers exported it in bulk to China 300 years ago. At one point it was New France's biggest export after fur.

That early over-harvesting kicked off a decline that has accelerated to the point where less than two dozen viable populations of wild American ginseng are left in Canada. Most of those are now monitored continuously in efforts to prevent extinction.